5 Benefits of Being More Coachable

baseball-coachable
Coachability is up to the PLAYER, not the coach.
Being asked to change or getting corrections on how to do something can be difficult to do or understanding. As with any area in life – the classroom, on the job, our personal life, in a sport – being able to receive advice and mentorship is a necessary part of growth. As a coach-instructor, it can become extremely frustrating to work with a player that is uncoachable. Uncoachable players show the following behaviors and characteristics:

  • Player tends to roll our eyes or take things personally that they shouldn’t.
  • Players seem ungrateful even to those who help the most.
  • Players read into things more deeply than they should.
  • Players often believe everything is about them, even someone else’s bad day.
  • Players body language shows the resistance to change/corrections.

Most of the time uncoachable players don’t even know they are uncoachable. The player looks to the coach, the team, other players, the equipment and even the sport. In the end, the player must realize that it is them. A player’s coachability is a mentality that requires diligence and attention from the player. In other words: coachability is up to the player, not the coach. Players that are coachable display the following characteristics:

  • Be open to honest feedback.
  • Be willing to change your habits.
  • Be humble.
  • Be willing to work hard.
  • Be thankful someone will take the time to help you improve and push you beyond your limits.

Why be coachable? The most obvious reason is to get better. All coaches want to help you get better in life and in your sport. Coachable players create a fun team environment. The following are 5 benefits of being coachable:

5 Benefits of Being Coachable

  • More playing time (and less drill or bench time).
  • Greater cohesion with team and/or coaches.
  • Accelerated learning.
  • Deeper and more fulfilling relationships with your coaches.
  • Greater internal calm: accepting criticism for what it is (INFORMATION) instead of what it isn’t (AN ATTACK) requires a solid internal foundation.
“Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” – Albert Einstein

About the author: David Lovell

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